Photo Credit: Monika Lightstone

Photo Credit: Monika Lightstone

Sarah Horwitz* works in oil on wood. Curator Edward Maldonado of The Department of Cultural Affairs, City of Chicago, states: "The paintings focus on more elemental qualities -- earth, air, fire, water ...[Horwitz] also paints flora and fauna executed with a rich and vibrant color palette, with the overall effect both highly emotive and enigmatic...Indeed, there remains a strong tradition in the arts regarding the symbolic representation of the physical world as a metaphor for the spiritual and the transcendent."

Currently exhibiting in "Dimensions of Spirituality" at the UJA Federation, New York, NYcurated by Donna Stein and also at the "Bread and Salt" exhibition at UCLA Dortort Center for the Arts, Sarah was recently included in the "LA Alternating Currents" exhibition at the Neutra Museum and Gallery in Silver Lake curated by Sara Cannon and the LA facet of the Jerusalem Biennale 2015 (Review/interview by Baha Danesh: www.wechooseart.com/sarah-horwitz/). Solo shows include The Dortort Center for the Arts at UCLA, Perimeter Gallery in Chicago, the Chicago Cultural Center and Gramercy Fine Art in New York. Included numerous times in the International Art Expo in Chicago via Perimeter Gallery, Sarah's works are in the collection of Fidelity Investments corporate headquarters in Boston and in private collections in the USA and Europe. Sarah's work has been written about in Where Chicago MagazineChicago Sun Times, and The New Art Examiner.

As faculty in the BFA program at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago for ten years, Sarah taught painting, drawing and studio research seminars. After completing a BS in film from Boston University, Sarah earned MA and MFA degrees in painting and drawing from The University of Iowa where she was awarded a merit scholarship. Raised in northern New Jersey, Sarah currently lives and works in Los Angeles.

*Sarah Horwitz (aka Dana Garner) — Many post-Holocaust American Jews are given an English and a Jewish name; in adulthood, Sarah chose to use the Hebrew name she was given at birth.